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Kanye West Can’t Sell ‘White Lives Matter’ Shirts Because Two Black Radio Hosts Own the Trademark

What is stopping Kanye West from selling those controversial “White Lives Matter” T-shirts?

Two Black radio hosts from Phoenix, Arizona, own the trademark of the counter-protest phase to “Black Lives Matter,” Capital B News reported.

Quinton Ward (Left) and Ramses Ja, co-hosts of Civic Cipher (photo: Civic Cipher website)/Candace Owens and Kanye West in “White Lives Matter” tee shirts (Getty Images/Twitter)

Trademark Gifted

Ramses Ja and Quinton Ward, who co-host the show Civic Cipher, didn’t apply for the trademark. It was actually gifted to them y an anonymous listener who had trademarked the phrase to make sure it wasn’t used for anti-Black propaganda. In September, the listener offered to transfer the trademark to Ja and Ward, and the duo officially took possession of the trademark on Oct. 28.

“This person who first procured it didn’t really love owning it, because the purpose was not necessarily to get rich off of it,” Ja told Capital B News. “The purpose was to make sure that other people didn’t get rich off of that pain.”

About the Trademark

According to the federal government’s trademark database, Civic Cipher took ownership of the trademark after it was secured on Oct. 3, The Daily Beat reported.

The trademark covers a wide array of uses: “Blouses; Boxer shorts; Graphic T-shirts; Hooded sweatshirts; Jeggings, namely, pants that are partially jeans and partially leggings; Jogging suits; Ladies’ underwear; Leggings; Overcoats; Polo shirts; Shirts; Short trousers; Short-sleeved or long-sleeved t-shirts; Short-sleeved shirts; Shorts; Ski masks; Sleeveless jerseys; Small hats; Socks; Sports jackets; Sports shirts; Sweat pants; Sweat shirts; Sweat suits; Sweatpants; Sweatshirts; Sweatsocks; Sweatsuits; Tank-tops; Tee-shirts; Women’s clothing, namely, shirts, dresses, skirts, blouses.”

Ja and Ward have sole ownership over the phrase and the ability to sue anyone or company who uses the saying for financial gain.

“The way the law works is either you’re owning phrases, or it’s up for grabs for people to make money off them,” Ja told Capital B News. “This person who first procured it didn’t really love owning it, because the purpose was not necessarily to get rich off of it; the purpose was to make sure that other people didn’t get rich off of that pain.”

West and ‘White Lives Matter’

Right before Kanye West’s rants on Judaism, he and conservative podcast host Candace Owens performed a publicity stunt by both wearing “White Lives Matter” T-shirts.

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